Logan: Official Trailer #1

Logan is an upcoming 2016 American superhero film directed by James Mangold. It is the tenth installment in the X-Men film franchise, and is the final installment set to feature Hugh Jackman as James Howlett/Wolverine/Logan. It is loosely based upon the famous comic book storyline Old Man Logan by Mark Millar. The film also stars Patrick Stewart, returning as Professor X, as well as Narcos star Boyd Holbrook as Donald Pierce, Dafne Keen as X-23, Stephen Merchant as Caliban. Richard E. Grant, Eriq La Salle, Elise Neal, and Elizabeth Rodriguez have been cast in unspecified roles.

The X-Men franchise has had an extremely turbulent history. Rocketing onto the screen in 2001 with director Bryan Singer, the original X-Men film and it’s sequel X2 are credited along with Spider-Man for legitimizing, revitalizing, and revolutionizing the superhero genre. Everything after X2 has been hit-or-miss, however. The Last Stand, directed by Brett Ratner, is somewhat of a gold standard for bad modern superhero movies, and X-Men Origins: Wolverine is legendary for all the wrong reasons. Future Kingsman director Matthew Vaughn was able to put the series back on track with the excellent X-Men: First Class, which among other things, introduced the brilliant actors James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender to mainstream audiences, playing young Charles Xavier and Erik Lehnsherr, respectively. James Mangold was then brought on to direct The Wolverine, an unimpressive, uninspired Wolverine film that, while not terrible, left much to be desired. It was extremely bland and rather tame.

Bryan Singer’s return with 2014’s Days Of Future Past was, in my opinion, the best X-Men film to date. It was a perfect representation of everything the X-Men should be. Created in the early 1960’s at the hight of the Civil Rights Movement, the X-Men were used to tackle complicated social issues and, frankly, be freaking awesome at the same time. DoFP was a perfect representation of that. Fans of the franchise were overjoyed that the X-Men were good again. Followed up by the hilarious comedy Deadpoolthings continued to look good for the franchise. Sadly, 2016’s X-Men: Apocalypse was nothing short of a bland, boring, confusing mess. Many are confused by the franchise’s innate lack of consistency, especially considering making a good superhero film after one of the most iconic and influential superhero teams in history should be relatively easy. This has led many to wonder if the franchise should not just simply be put to rest.

I hope you will forgive my franchise history lesson, I just wish to explain in full why I am extremely apprehensive concerning Logan. I am curious and confused as to why Fox once again gave this movie to James Mangold, considering how blah The Wolverine was. I am concerned that the franchise will, for whatever reason, never be able to find stable footing. Though it is a rather impressive trailer, and I think the use of Johnny Cash’s Hurt is a great way to portray this film as being more emotional than most superhero films, I am worried and skeptical. As with everything involving this franchise, Logan is very much a potential hit or miss ordeal. Boasting an undeniably intriguing and impressive trailer with intriguing aspects and awesome visuals, the film nevertheless has a questionable director behind the camera; part of a franchise that has been rather questionable for the last decade or so. I am neither against this movie, nor am I even close to sold. All I can hope for is a good send-off for Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine. Please… Maybe Logan will be another good movie in the franchise, I don’t know. We’ll see.

The Accountant

The Accountant is a 2016 American action thriller film directed by Gavin O’Connor and written by Bill Dubduque. The film stars Ben Affleck, Jon Bernthal, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, J.K. Simmons, and Anna Kendrick. Affleck stars as the autistic son of a U.S. Army Psychological Operations officer. He was of the belief that his autistic son should learn to live in the harshness of the world and overcome it, rather than adapt the world to him. To that effect, the Colonel raises his son and has him train with a number of combat specialists. He essentially becomes a living weapon. He grows up and becomes a forensic accountant for a number of very dangerous criminal organizations, currently operating under the alias Christian Wolff.

Though coming under some controversy for supposedly exploiting autism, as someone very well-versed on the subject, I did not see it that way at all. No, having autism in no way makes you a super-assassin, but it is an entertaining idea, and the film in no way belittles people with autism, nor does it patronize them. The behavioral and neurological factors of autism are rather well portrayed by Affleck. It is very respectful of the condition in that aspect. There’s also some exploration of sensory overload, an aspect of autism I do not feel gets as much love as it should. Yes, autism is used in The Accountant as (half) of an explanation as to why Wolff is an effective killing machine, but I don’t have a problem with that, and don’t see why people do. Autism is portrayed rather accurately in The Accountant. Christian Wolff is never pitied and treated as an unstoppable force of sheer and abject violence and terror, just like any other highly-trained, cold, calculating assassin, as well he should be.

Boasting a rather ridiculous and unrealistic premise, The Accountant is nevertheless a solid film.The film features a very good and, as I mentioned, mostly accurate performance from Ben Affleck. The fight choreography is very well-done, using pencak silat, the martial art used in The Raid, and the shootouts are excellent, on par with John Wick, even. There is a farmhouse shootout that serves as the first major action piece of the movie; it is extremely entertaining. The Accountant, in fact, seems to draw from John Wick in several aspects. John Wick is a smarter-than-it-seems action thriller that purposefully leaves some questions about the plot unanswered, and gives an extremely limited backstory on the main character himself in order to  preserve his legend and mystique, making John Wick as a character seem a lot more interesting. The Accountant does this effectively. There really isn’t a lot we know about “Wolff,” which isn’t even his real name. His legend is very effective. Another benefit of leaving some things to the imagination is avoiding too much exposition. Some modern action movies make the mistake of thinking the “movie (plot)” part is more important than the “action” part, overburdening the audience with needless and ultimately annoying exposition that gets in the way of what the audience came to see. The Accountant does this well, to an extent, although there are some very crucial plot elements that are not explained in any detail and require explanation in order to make sense, leaving the audience confused at some places. There’s a difference between leaving things unsaid in a film, and leaving plot holes. The Accountant tends to stray too far in one direction, and really drags down what would’ve been a great film, instead ending up just a pretty good one. The film features a subplot of Treasury agents on Wolff’s trail, but they never even come close. Although it ends up being a rather sizeable chunk of the film, I wonder why they are even in there.

Anna Kendrick’s performance leaves much to be desired. Though my slight celebrity crush on her prohibits me from calling her absolutely terrible, they would have been better served here casting another actress who doesn’t look and dress like a college freshman, as her character is an accountant for a robotics firm.

One thing I can say for certain is I need more Bernthal in my life. If you are one of the poor, unlucky souls yet to feel the Bern (bringing it back), Jon Bernthal is best known for his performance as Shane in The Walking Dead and more recently for his role as Frank Castle/The Punisher in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a role that has rightfully netted more acclaim and notoriety than his Walking Dead role ever will. Also featured in a small role in SicarioBernthal is extremely effective at anti-hero roles, and is one of the most underutilized character actors in Hollywood, though hopefully not for long. Bernthal can flip on a dime, at first being absolutely horrifying and intimidating, and then empathetic and likeable. Proof of this can easily be found in the opening of Daredevil: Season 2 and his monologue a few episodes later.

In The Accountant, Bernthal plays a ruthless, yet unsettlingly likeable assassin who comes up against our protagonist, attempting to dispatch him in efficient fashion several times, yet failing to kill him, leading him to consider the The Accountant his equal. Bernthal’s character and performance is interesting and engaging; I can’t wait for the day he firmly establishes himself in Hollywood, as his performance, along with Affleck’s, serves to offset the damage done by a holey script.

The Accountant is an effective, yet flawed effort by Warrior director Gavin O’Connor. Though by no means perfect, it is unabashedly entertaining, utilizing a unique and suitably ridiculous premise to interesting and positive effect. It is at times confusing and unengaging, but ultimately enjoyable and fun, with several neat ideas and aspects littered throughout that add layers to what could have been cliché, boring, or worst, offensive. It isn’t the best film of the year, by any means, but I would be lying if I said I didn’t enjoy myself.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid: Redemption is a 2011 Indonesian action martial arts film written and directed by Welsh filmmaker Gareth Evans. Evans’ preceding  film was 2009’s Merantau, which starred Iko Uwais. Evans was a student living in Indonesia when he discovered the little-known but effective and interesting form of martial arts known as pencak silat. Evans felt that pencak silat would make for a great martial arts film, and teamed up with Iko Uwais, an actor and practitioner of pencak silat, for Merantau, which received positive reviews and a sizeable amount of international recognition.

Uwais and Evans teamed up again for 2011’s The Raid, which was released in international markets as The Raid: Redemption. The film stars Iko Uwais, Donny Alamsyah, Joe Taslim, Ray Sahetaphy, Yayan Ruhian, and Pierre Gruno. Rama is a member of a special tactics team in the capital city of Jakarta, the capital and most populous city in Indonesia. The 20-man squad he is a part of is tasked with capturing Tama, a notorious drug lord operating out of a high-rise in the city slums. The mission is masterminded by a lieutenant named Waiyhu. It turns out Waiyhu is a dirty cop operating on orders of other dirty cops, the mission is unsanctioned, and they are operating without backup. The operation goes to pot, and the 20-man team is swiftly cut down to 4.5, as a officer named Bowo ends up critically wounded. What becomes a police raid becomes a raid on the police; the high-rise is a safe haven for scumbags of all kinds, and Tama offers rent-free living to anyone who helps “cut down the infestation.” The men are now in a desperate fight for their lives. It develops that his own life isn’t the only one Rama’s concerned with saving.

The Raid, both literally and metaphorically, doesn’t pull any punches. With a budget equivalent to a relatively paltry $1.1 million, The Raid is dirty, nasty, and intense. There is no flair; it doesn’t try to be more than what it is: bone-crunchingly violent and entertaining to watch. The simple, yet effective plot is set up within the 20-minute mark, leaving an hour-and-a-half for a glorious smorgasbord of forearm blocks, forearm strikes, tackles, grapples, chokeholds, armbars, bullets, guns, machetes, blood, and sound effects most likely captured by the sound guy going to town on a bag of Lay’s Potato Chips.

The choreography for this wonderful fight-fest is the most fast-paced and kinetic as you have ever seen. As I have mentioned before, I have somewhat of a weird fascination with martial arts and a good fight scene  What I may have neglected to mention was The Raid began that fascination. This movie is insane. It is balls-to-the-wall brutal and fast but still manages to be interesting and complex, in terms of choreography. This makes Mad Max or John Wick look like child’s play.

The Raid, for being a very straightforward martial arts film, also features rather decent acting and a twist or two along the way. Iko Uwais is a good actor, so are Donny Alamsayah and Joe Taslim. Rama and Andi are empathetic enough to be effective characters, and the Sarge is a boss. To put it in the most simple of terms, The Raid offers a mind-blowing amount of insane and well-put-together action, with passable acting and a setting, story, and script that is nothing more than an excuse for the insanity. I don’t see why that’s a problem; with action and stunts as nuts as the ones you see in this movie, it shouldn’t be. Nevertheless, the late, grate Roger Ebert panned the film, giving it a scathing indictment and 1 out of 4 stars. I feel as though Ebert heard that The Raid was awesome but had no idea why. Don’t watch The Raid expecting anything thought-provoking, watch it expecting to see a lot of people end up with every bone in their body destroyed, a gelatinous, writhing shell of what used to be a scumbag drug dealer.

In America, The Raid came under fire for ripping off the plot of the cult action film Dredd, a film which came out earlier that same year. Nothing came of this, though, and only served to bolster the film’s notoriety in the U.S. Indeed, its violent antics and controversy with Dredd have made The Raid a cult classic film for action junkies like myself, which made it quite successful in overseas markets. The Raid more than quadrupled its budget due to all of this, which has led to a sequel, released in 2014, with a third installment planned in 2018. An American remake is also in the early stages of production, and as far as I know, Frank Grillo, known as Crossbones in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the protagonist of the latter two films in The Purge franchise, is set to lead.

The Raid is an awesome action movie that doesn’t bring much else to the table, mainly because it doesn’t need to in any way, shape, or form. You know what you’re getting into. If you want action, this is your film. If you want thought or plot, go find something else.

Iron Fist (NYCC Trailer)

Iron Fist is an upcoming Netflix Original Series. It is the fourth and final individual installment in the Defenders franchise before the big team up miniseries. Iron Fist will follow Daredevil (first and second season), Jessica Jonesand the recently released Luke Cage. The series is being helmed by Scott Buck, former writer of cult TV series like HBO’s Six Feet Under and Rome, CBS’ Everybody Loves RaymondABC’s Coach, and, most notably, Showtime’s DexterThe series will primarily be written by one Tamara Becher. Iron Fist stars Game of Thrones alum Finn Jones, Jessica Henwick, Jessica Stroup, David Wenham, Tom Pelphry, and Lewis Tan.

Jones stars as Danny Rand. Danny is the son of Wendell Rand,  who discovered the mystical teleporting city of  K’un-Lun as a young boy and saved its leader. After growing up, Wendell moved to New York City and became an entrepenuer, marrying a wealthy socialite named Heather Duncun. Danny is their only child. When Danny was nine, Wendell mounted an expedition with Danny, Heather, and Wendell’s unscrupulous business partner Harold Meechum. Daniel slips while on a path his tie-rope putting both him and his parents in danger. Meechum forces Wendell to his death, but offers to save Danny and Heather, whom he is in love with. She rejects him and they set out on their own. They encounter a makeshift bridge that appears out of nowhere and are attacked by wolves. She is killed even as archers from K’un-Lun attempt to save her. The grieving Danny is taken to meet Yu-Ti, the leader of K’un-Lun and the man Wendell saved all those years ago. Expressing a deep-seated desire for vengeance against Meechum, Danny is put under the tutilage of Lei Kung, the most talented martial artist in the Marvel Universe. Danny proves to be Lei Kung’s most gifted student. The almost overly-dedicated Danny used to condition his fists by plunging them into sand and gravel to toughen them. At 19, Danny is given the opportunity to become an Iron Fist. To do so he must defeat a dragon; Shou-Lao the Undying, who guards the molten heart that had been taken from him. During the battle, Danny throws himself up against the Scar of Shou-Lao, which burns a scar onto his chest. Danny is successful and gains the mystical powers of the Iron Fist. It is later revealed that he is part of a long line of Iron Fist warriors. Danny returns to Earth  when K’un-Lun teleports there after ten years. Danny swears to avenge his parents’ deaths as Iron Fist, all the while reclaiming ownership of the Rand Corporation, making Danny a billionaire.

Iron Fist has a lot to live up to. For me, though all of Marvel’s Netflix series have been great in their own right, none of them have been able to live up to Daredevil’s first season. This is primarily due to two factors. Matt Murdock, the protagonist of Daredevil, is a man who was blinded at birth, heightening his other senses to an astounding degree. He has been described as “a blind man who can see.” Murdock learns martial arts from an old man and uses his skill and extraordinary attributes to protect Hell’s Kitchen from danger. Matt Murdock is, at the end of the day, a man just like you and me. He can be, and has been, shot in the head at point blank range, stabbed, and brutally beaten. Jessica Jones and Luke Cage never have to deal with that. Even as superheroes, their struggles are internal rather than external. Matt has to deal with both. This makes him more interesting on several fronts; it’s ironic that he is sometimes known as The Devil of Hell’s Kitchen, because the personal, professional, and vigilante lives of attorney Matt Murdock are quite literally a living Hell. Coming from this point, the fight sequences and action in Daredevil was and always will be top notch and completely badass, but Jessica Jones and Luke Cage seem lacking in this aspect, comparitively. Iron Fist, in the nature of itself, bring the pain. I sense Danny’s personal life will end up entirely out of control, too. One very minor criticism I have is Finn Jones kinda looks too much like a hipster Neil Patrick Harris for my tase.

I will be anticipating Iron Fist like I have anticipated all Defenders series. Iron Fist will land on Netflix on March 17th, 2017, followed by the Defenders miniseries some time later that same year. Season 1 of The Punisher spinoff will arrive either in late 2017 or early 2018, followed by Daredevil Season 3 in 2018.

Marvel’s Luke Cage: Season 1 (Spoilers)

Marvel’s Luke Cage premiered on Netflix on September 30th, 2016 with 13 episodes. It is the fourth overall installment in the Defenders franchise following the first season of Daredevil, the first season of Jessica Jones, and Daredevil’s second season. Luke Cage follows the titular hero in Harlem after being featured as a major player in Jessica Jones. Luke Cage is a wrongfully convicted man who was sent to Seagate Prision and subjected to horrible experiments that gave him super strength and unbreakable skin. Cage escaped and has been a fugitive from justice ever since. The series stars Mike Colter, Mahershala Ali (Remy Danton from House of Cards), Simone Missick, Theo Rossi, Erik LaRay Harvey, Rosario Dawson, and Alfre Woodard.

Luke Cage has been working two jobs in New York City’s iconic Harlem neighborhood, insisting to be paid in cash. He works one job as a janitor in Pops’ Barber Shop. Pops is a reformed ex-con who’s shop has turned into a safe haven for street kids, doing whatever he can to help them stay off the street. He is a father figure to many, including Detective Misty Knight, Cage himself, and even Cottonmouth, to some extent. Cage’s second job is as a dishwasher at Harlem’s Paradise, a club owned and operated by Cornell “Cottonmouth” Stokes, a crime boss that runs drugs and guns in Harlem. He is covertly alligned in a conspiracy with his cousin, City Councilwoman Mariah Dillard. Dillard is currently working on a series of ambitious new housing projects with the goal of bringing Harlem back to its former glory, each named after famous black heroes, most notably Crispus Attucks, the first man to die in the famed Boston Massacre for what would become America. (I put that in there just to brag that my US History class is teaching me things.) Dillard embezzled city money to back Cottonmouth’s huge gun deal with Latino crime lord Domingo, as well as an extensive renovation of Harlem’s Paradise.

Dante is a bartender at Harlem’s Paradise who is friends with Chico and Shameek, two of Pops’ young charges. They stage a raid of the weapons deal, ruining Domingo and Cottonmouth’s partnership. Shameek kills Dante when Dante panics. Chico does not have the stomach for this, and literally throws up after seeing Shameek brutally kill Dante. Shameek and Chico split the money. With his dying breath, Dante calls Cottonmouth’s crew and gives up the two teens. Shameek is captured and brutally murdered by Cottonmouth himself.

This murder, as well as the junkyard shootout, come to the attention of NYPD Detectives Misty Knight, a street-smart and brilliant detective who played basketball after hearing her father and Pops argue over the sport constantly when she was a child, and her partner, Detective Rafael Scarfe. The night of the initial raid, Knight was working undercover at the Harlem’s Paradise, where she began a rapport and an immediate sexual relationship with Cage.

After Shameek’s murder, the terrified Chico returns to Pops for protection. The big-hearted man is angry and saddened at Chico’s recklessness and stupidity, but still accepts the boy with open arms after a tearful reunion. Pops, through Cage, attempts to set up a meeting with Cottonmouth to negotiate the money for the boy’s life. The barber shop in Harlem has always had respect, no matter who’s side you’re on. “This place is Switzerland.” Cottonmouth, who has respect for Pops, agrees to the meeting. Chico was spotted in the barbershop, leading Cottonmouth’s lackey Tone to shoot up the barbershop, killing Pops and wounding Chico. Cage shields a young boy in the shop with his own body. This action, Cage’s lack of an explanation, and the fact that he has been at the center of everything, leads to suspicion from the two detectives. Cottonmouth throws Tone off the roof, enraged at his “executive decision.” Despite the fact Tone went against Cottonmouth’s wishes, Cage holds the unstable crime boss responsible and swears to even the score.

Luke Cage is another extremely unique and interesting addition to both the Marvel Cinematic Universe at large as well as Netflix’s growing catalogue of excellent original series. Jessica Jones was able to have a progressive and thoughtful conversation about sexual assault, domestic violence, and the nature of mental illness (specifically PTSD) without any politicizing of the subject. Luke Cage does much of the same thing with black culture. Luke Cage is the most stylized of Netlix’s Original Series so far, with overt references and homages to various 70s blaxplotation films. Shaft, the works of Quentin Tarantino (Django Unchained is overtly referenced, with the series taking obvious stylistic cues from both Pulp Fiction and the underrated Jackie Brown). 

While Jessica Jones chose to approach its subject matter on a metaphorical basis, Luke Cage is very direct in its message concerning black culture in America. Cottonmouth wants money and power, believing that to be the thing people notice about others, especially African-Americans. Mariah and Cage, however, believe that respect is the single most important thing a black American could have. Like Jessica Jones, Luke Cage is able to send a powerful and thoughtful message without becoming preachy or political. Luke Cage is as much of a story about the city of Harlem and Black America as it is about Cage vs. Cottonmouth.

Luke Cage not only pulls from black culture in terms of visual style and dramatic themes, but also musically. Luke Cage has the best soundtrack in a Marvel feature since the catchy 80’s-infused tunes of Guardians of the Galaxy, but Luke Cage is on the complete opposite end of the spectrum. Featuring hardcore rap courtesy of artists like Method Man and Wu Tang Clan, as well as R&B from Raphael SaadiqFaith Evans, and Charles Bradley, not to mention countless other notable artists from prominent genres , Luke Cage features a catchy, specialized, yet diverse number of songs that compliment the themes of the series and will stay in your head for some time, and I even neglected to mention the great theme tune.

Overall, if I had one criticism of the series, it is concerning series lead Mike Coulter. His performance as Cage in Jessica Jones was rather impressive, but Coulter seems a little wooden in his own series. Though certainly not bad, I feel that there are some aspects of his performance that leave much to be desired. On the other hand, Mahershala Ali is an excellent villain and an excellent actor. Theo Rossi’s performance as the mysterious “Shades” was also very impressive, and Alfre Woodard is a force to be reckoned with.

Luke Cage is ultimately proof that you can make good TV out of anything. Luke Cage as a character is, at his core, simply a nigh-invincible black guy with super strength. That could wear thin very quickly, but showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker realized this, and decided to make Luke Cage about so much more than the man himself. Though not good enough to break my unwavering favorable bias towards its cousin series Daredevil, Luke Cage is highly entertaining, highly addictive, well-made, and another solid addition to the Marvel/Netflix team up; by the way, it crashed Netflix. This only makes me more excited for Iron Fist, and has me hoping for Heroes for Hire somewhere down the line.

Westworld (Pilot) [SPOILERS]

Westworld is a science-fiction psuedo-Western mystery drama television series created by Jonathon Nolan and Lisa Joy for HBO. It is based upon the 1973 film of the same name by Michael Crichton. The series stars Evan Rachel Wood, Thandie Newton, Jeffery Wright, James Marsden, Luke Hemsworth, Simon Quarterman, Anthony Hopkins, and Ed Harris. Westworld premiered on October 2nd. I have been anticipating the series for quite some time, and it is finally time to see if my high expectations can be met.

Taking place some time in the future, Westworld is a hyper-realistic theme park populated by lifelike androids called hosts. Regular programming updates occur, managed by head of the Programming Division, Bernard, the successor to the brilliant and enigmatic Dr. Robert Ford, the creator of both the Host androids and Westworld itself.There are also updates to the main narrative of Westworld, managed by the arrogant but creative Lee Sizemore. Theresa Cullen is the Operations Director of Westworld, working closely with Bernard to deal with any malfunctioning Hosts or other developments. Hosts that are either outdated or begin to malfunction are sent to cold storage. Bernard is usually able to fix the bugs and send them back into rotation. Westworld Hosts begin to experience a number of bugs and glitches. Bernard discovers that these glitches are due to Dr. Ford’s “reveries.” These reveries are subtle gestures Hosts use that make them seem more human and lifelike to the guests. Hosts have their memories purged regularly, but Dr. Ford discovered a way to access them, creating a subconscious of sorts. The updated Hosts are all killed in a robbery orchestrated by the team and rolled back.

Meanwhile, we follow Delores, a Host in Westworld. She wakes up every morning and goes down to the station (where guests arrive) and normally, barring any interruptions by the guests, encounters Teddy, another Host and the love of her life, who arrives on the train with the guests every morning. A peaceful day with Teddy is interrupted by The Man in Black, a sadistic and mysterious guest with a hidden agenda, who spends the episode searching for answers to his unknown query. The Man in Black ruthlessly murders Delores’ father, mother, and Teddy, and presumably rapes and kills Delores. It is possible and probable that guests kill the Hosts, but Hosts cannot, due to their programming, bring harm to any living thing, even a fly. Hosts kill other Hosts all the time. One of the Hosts glitches out, killing several other Hosts in a psychotic rampage. Throughout the episode, Delores must deal with the turmoil in her life caused by the glitched out Hosts and the mysterious Man in Black. Of course, she has no memory of these events after being killed.

The film on which the series is based is a rather straightforward narrative about AI gone bad with hidden depths. Westworld as a series is so much more than that. Instead of AI gone bad, we are presented with an Asmovian tale of the android Hosts and their benevolent and omnipresent masters behind the scenes. Delores is the series’ de facto protagonist, as it seems. You end up caring more for the Hosts than you do about the humans, who are presented in a more antagonistic vibe, though you can understand and empathize with everyone’s perspective. as well. The Hosts have thoughts, beliefs, emotions, much like humans, but they are treated as tools. Peter, Delores’ father, discovers a picture of a guest from the real world, which causes the android to have nothing less than a complete and utter breakdown.

In the film, the robots go bad in a big way, but I don’t think that is what the series will focus on. We are one hour in, and there are already many questions, both philosophical and narrative ones, that need to be answered, questions about the nature of reality, the nature of artificial intelligence, ethics when it comes to technology, and humanity’s reach exceeding its grasp. Westworld is truly a work of narrative brilliance.

The acting in Westworld is flawless. Evan Rachel Wood, Anthony Hopkins, Jeffery Wright, James Marsden, Ed Harris, and Louis Herthum are all great. Westworld has a budget of $100 million. With this massive budget, series creator, writer, and director of the pilot episode, Jonathon Nolan, is able to create a believable Westworld, and a believable future, as well. Subtle visual effects were used to make the actors seem more robotic.

Westworld is as intense as it is philosophical. The events that occur in Westworld itself are brutal, violent, and vicious. The series is as much a straight western as it is a sci-fi. To me, the most important question isn’t what’s going on with the Hosts at large, but what is up with the Man in Black? What does he want, and why is he torturing and slaughtering Hosts to get it?

Speaking of black, Westworld showed off its musical stylings and cinematic flair in one very interesting and engrossing scene. Using an orchestral cover of Paint It Black by the Rolling Stones, the saloon robbery is possibly the most notable scene of the entire episode.

Featuring a score by Game of Thrones composer Ramin Djawadi, the music of Westworld is as haunting as it is addicting; it is another wonderfully constructed piece of the wonderfully constructed puzzle that is this series.

Westworld’s premiere episode had the network’s highest viewer count since True Detective in 2014, drawing in 3.3 million viewers. It is already well on its way to being HBO’s flagship series following the soon-approaching end to Game of Thrones. This excellent revival of an excellent film is certainly a must watch for me, and it should be for you, as well. The pilot episode is free to stream right now. As for any further reviews, I will most likely wait until the season is over to share the entirety of my thoughts on it, I just felt it necessary to get the word out, because this show is awesome and it can only get better.